Decomposition Study: Day 2

When I left work last night (about 6:00pm) I took some updated photos and posted them. This morning after pulling in I took a look and snapped a pic of our groundhog.

You can definitely see a change in the size of the little guy within this first day. She’s quite bloated and there is evidence of bacterial action. The bloat is caused by the exponential increase in the amount of bacteria normally found in the body. Just like humans, this groundhog, once it ceased to breathe and circulate blood through its body, was no longer keeping the bacteria and fungi at a standard level. Now, they’re just reproducing like crazy, causing gasses to form. Sometimes these gasses can cause weak areas of the body and places that have been damaged to rupture and internal organs and fluids will push themselves out (see below image of the pig) but normally these gasses will escape through natural openings on the body like the mouth and anus. When I moved this little groundhog boy did I get a whiff!!!

Day 1 Full Body 11:00am

Day 1 Full Body
11:00am

Day 2: Full Body 9:00am

Day 2: Full Body
9:00am

From an undergraduate research project.  Day 2, gasses have caused a perforation through a weakened spot on the abdomen of this pig.  Intestines have pushed through.

From an undergraduate research project. Day 2, gasses have caused a perforation through a weakened spot on the abdomen of this pig. Intestines have pushed through.

You can see in the below image a group of Blow/Bottle Flies (Calliphoridae: Diptera) congregating around the snout. Yesterdays image taken about 8 hours after placement shows some bubbling of fluids and gas in the nose. Today’s image, almost 27 hours after placement, shows the bubbling continues with maggots (fly larvae) on the other side.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate around the nose.  Maggots in foreground.  1rst instar blow fly larvae.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate around the nose. Maggots in foreground. 1rst instar blow fly larvae.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate

I also have found more egg laying locations including in the lip (below – as expected) and on the underside of the body at the point of interface with the soil.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Eggs under the lip and snot-blood bubbles in the nose.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Eggs under the lip and snot-blood bubbles in the nose.

Soil Temp: 90F
Interface Temp: 80F
Mouth Temp: 100F
Calliphoridae: 10+ adults; 50+ larvae; 100+ eggs
Staphylinidae: 1 adults

IMG_3536

IMG_3537

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