Decomp Project: Full Meal Deal

Remember that groundhog I placed out there two weeks ago?  Anyone have a guess as to what happened to it?  Well, it went all pancakey that’s what!  Pancakey…that’s the official scientific term for it.

Who wants to guess how long it took?  Here’s a video I put together including some images and video I took of the process.  You might be surprised by what you will see visiting the remains.  Now, before you watch this, I want you to take a guess as to how long it took to go from fresh to skeletonized.

The Cicadas are Coming! The Cicadas are Coming!!!!

Periodical cicadas have very long life cycles and depending upon what part of the country you are in will dictate which Brood will be emerging this year. This year is a Brood II year which is primary on the north eastern seaboard and inland a bit. If you live in an area outside of this and see some periodical cicadas they likely are not from Brood II but rather some early risers or some stragglers from your regional brood. Animals don’t read books so they don’t always know which year they’re “supposed” to emerge. There are always some outliers.

Here’s a link to a LINK for where you can check to see when you can expect the Periodical Cicadas to emerge in your area.  Missing out this year?  Maybe next year will be better!

969119_578595518829819_241170528_n (2)

Decomposition Study: Day 2

When I left work last night (about 6:00pm) I took some updated photos and posted them. This morning after pulling in I took a look and snapped a pic of our groundhog.

You can definitely see a change in the size of the little guy within this first day. She’s quite bloated and there is evidence of bacterial action. The bloat is caused by the exponential increase in the amount of bacteria normally found in the body. Just like humans, this groundhog, once it ceased to breathe and circulate blood through its body, was no longer keeping the bacteria and fungi at a standard level. Now, they’re just reproducing like crazy, causing gasses to form. Sometimes these gasses can cause weak areas of the body and places that have been damaged to rupture and internal organs and fluids will push themselves out (see below image of the pig) but normally these gasses will escape through natural openings on the body like the mouth and anus. When I moved this little groundhog boy did I get a whiff!!!

Day 1 Full Body 11:00am

Day 1 Full Body
11:00am

Day 2: Full Body 9:00am

Day 2: Full Body
9:00am

From an undergraduate research project.  Day 2, gasses have caused a perforation through a weakened spot on the abdomen of this pig.  Intestines have pushed through.

From an undergraduate research project. Day 2, gasses have caused a perforation through a weakened spot on the abdomen of this pig. Intestines have pushed through.

You can see in the below image a group of Blow/Bottle Flies (Calliphoridae: Diptera) congregating around the snout. Yesterdays image taken about 8 hours after placement shows some bubbling of fluids and gas in the nose. Today’s image, almost 27 hours after placement, shows the bubbling continues with maggots (fly larvae) on the other side.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate around the nose.  Maggots in foreground.  1rst instar blow fly larvae.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate around the nose. Maggots in foreground. 1rst instar blow fly larvae.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Adult blow flies congregate

I also have found more egg laying locations including in the lip (below – as expected) and on the underside of the body at the point of interface with the soil.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Eggs under the lip and snot-blood bubbles in the nose.

Day 2: 27 hours after placement. Eggs under the lip and snot-blood bubbles in the nose.

Soil Temp: 90F
Interface Temp: 80F
Mouth Temp: 100F
Calliphoridae: 10+ adults; 50+ larvae; 100+ eggs
Staphylinidae: 1 adults

IMG_3536

IMG_3537

Tastes Great, Less Filling!

Who’s hungry!?!

Insects provide the same nutrients that you get from other animal sources (yes, insects are animals!) at a fraction of the impact on the environment.  Companies like Chapul here in the United States are learning from what many have known for a long time, insects are good for you!  And when prepared right, can taste pretty great!

Of course, in many parts of the globe people have been eating insects for quite some time and have often perfected methods of preparation.  Some don’t consider a trip to Thailand complete unless they’ve had a chance to feast on some crickets.

Have you eaten insects before?  What did you think?

936126_10151369720071160_961549663_n

Forensic Entomology: Decomposition and Then Some

So, what is Forensic Entomology?  When someone says those two little words the first thing that pops into most peoples minds is Grissom from CSI.  Interesting though he may be (and loosely based on an actual Entomologist, Dr. Neil Haskell and Acarologist Dr. Lee Goff) there’s more to it than that.  Forensic entomology is more than just analyzing dead stinky stuff.  There are actually three different subfields of forensic entomology: Urban, Stored Product Pest and Medicolegal Entomology.  Medicolegal is the most commonly thought of branch but it is actually the branch that sees the least amount of use.  Termite cases comprise the vast majority of legal cases related to entomology and that’s what “Forensic Entomology” is: The application of Entomology, insects and other arthropods to legal issues.  This can be civil and criminal.

Think about how much you hear about bed bugs or carpenter ants, maggots, or bees in the news!  Aunt Sally went to that fast food restaurant and found a maggot in her burger?  Lawsuit! Bed bugs infesting an apartment complex that was supposed to have been treated?  Lawsuit!  New home owners have a termite problem but none was found by the initial inspection or disclosed by the original owners?  You bet there’s gonna be a lawsuit. Though very different in focus, all are examples of forensic entomology.  I happen to think that each has its fascinating points as well as wildly boring ones as well.

For your viewing pleasure, over the next few days I am going to walk you through the process of decomposition as it unfolds in my front yard.  I found a recently biffed groundhog and just placed it out this morning.  Over the coming days I’ll post pictures and some analysis of what is happening to the groundhog over time.

Day 1 Full Body

Day 1: Full Body
approx. 11:00am EST

Day 1: Head and forelegs

Day 1: Head and forelegs
approx. 11:00am EST

Day 1: Posterior

Day 1: Posterior
approx. 11:00am EST

**Edit** Added Images Later in the Day

Full View approx. 18:00 (6pm) EST

Full View
approx. 18:00 (6pm) EST

Eggs on lower abdomen approx. 18:00 (6pm) EST

Eggs on lower abdomen
approx. 18:00 (6pm) EST